Grand Cayman Islands

Turquoise waters lapped against Seven Mile Beach's fine white sands under incandescent blue skies. Neck deep in water as clear as a swimming pool, Gail gushed, "Look, I can see my toes! There's tiny fish skittering around." Many shops and restaurants displayed invitations to visit timeshare condominiums and offered cash incentives. We signed up for a meeting, vowing not to buy. We ended up buying but later changed our mind thinking we had a 3-day buyers remorse period. The salesman replied, "That only works in California. Grand Cayman is British territory." The Timeshare

The picture to the left is a tour guide holding up a stingray at the Sand Bar. Stingrays have gotten use to people at Grand Cayman. They congregate at Stingray City and the Sand Bar in the North Sound. The water is about 10-12 feet deep at Stingray City and 3-4 feet at the Sand Bar. As each tour boats haul in, the stingrays swim toward the boats looking for handouts. They keep their dangerous barbed stingers safely tucked away as they swim around people. Please note it's important to keep in mind that stingrays are wild creatures. Inexperienced people should not be picking up stingrays as shown in the photo.

The waters off of the Cayman Islands are among the best places in the world for snorkeling and scuba diving. There are many dive shops in Georgetown and at major hotels. The West Wall encompasses numerous dive sites. The South Wall offers shallow diving in exotic coral playgrounds. The North Wall features spine-tingling drops that may bring about panic, until you realize you're floating, not falling. The East End contains many of the island's least-explored sites.

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